Archives

Global Jet Stream
August 10

Recent Updates to Aeris Weather Maps

The Aeris Maps Platform (AMP) is a powerful tool allowing you to integrate weather imagery in a variety of methods, whether stand-alone static imagery, to animations, or to fully interactive weather maps. Over the past few weeks, we have continued improving and expanding our weather maps platform. One area of concentration has been with AMP’s speed and efficiency, especially for large image requests. We have seen considerable improvements from the most recent updates, with significant speed improvements and continued low error rates. We also continue to improve upon existing layers, including the recent addition of Canadian alerts, as well as releasing new layer offerings, such as lightning strikes....

Aeris Weather API
August 9

Aeris Weather API 1.7.3 Released

We have released version 1.7.3 of the Aeris Weather API to production that builds upon the recent Canadian weather alert additions and improved advisory support. We will highlight a few of these changes, though for the complete list of updates review the Aeris API release history.

Canadian Alerts on Globe
August 8

Canadian Weather Alerts Now Available

Weather plays a critical role in our lives and economy. To help inform on upcoming weather events, the National Weather Service (NWS) issues warnings, watches, and advisories. These alerts are available via the Aeris Weather API using the advisories endpoint and within the Aeris Maps Platform (AMP) utilizing the alerts layers. In Canada, Environment Canada (EC) issues similar alerts, and today we are announcing that Canadian weather alerts are now available within the Aeris Weather API and AMP.  Best of all, Canadian alerts are available to all API and AMP users with no additional development required! Canadian Weather Alerts in the Aeris Weather API For the Aeris...

aeris-kuber-kibana-header
August 7

Monitoring Kubernetes with Elasticsearch, Kibana, and Heapster

We recently took the plunge into using Kubernetes to orchestrate containers for a number of our web and data-ingest services. While we have been generally pleased with the experience, we have found metrics, monitoring, and logging to be major pain points for us. Kubernetes provides no out-of-the-box system for centralized logging, so we had resorted to scanning log files on individual pods with a lot of guess-and-check work in matching server logs to application behavior. Without any human-readable interface for viewing application metrics, it was really hard to construct a story describing why an application behaved the way it did. It was clear...