Blog: Tutorials

sunrise
May 16

Sunrise forecast using the Aeris Weather API

The sunrise marks the beginning of a brand new day. The ever-changing nature of weather means each new day brings with it the need for a new forecast. Whether you’re deciding what to wear for your morning run or wondering what the skies will be like as you photograph the sunrise, the weather is important. Our Aeris Weather API can provide the tools needed to find the sunrise forecast. This article will provide an example of how to use the Aeris Weather API endpoints to find the sunrise forecast. Sunmoon Endpoint Our sunmoon endpoint provides a potpourri of information about...

May 3

Protect Your Aeris API Credentials!

One of the most common concerns we encounter is how to protect your Aeris API credentials. While it can be difficult to have API credentials that are completely secure, we do provide tools to help assist with many threats. One of those tools is the namespace feature that we have built into the members area ready for you to use today. Locating Your API Credentials / Namespace Options Let’s start by logging into your account from the home page. Next, click on the Apps tab where you will have all the tools necessary for managing your applications. Here you will be...

May 2

Anticipate Threats with Weather Alerts

Previously in our severe weather series, we’ve discussed severe weather outlooks and storm cells. This article will continue the series by concentrating on the weather alerts datasets available with the Aeris API and the Aeris Maps Platform.  This information is perfect for integration into mobile and notification platforms, allowing you to notify users quickly when severe weather events may be nearing. These advisories datasets provides access to all currently active US advisories as issued by the National Weather Service (NWS). The NWS issues a variety of severe weather warnings, watches, advisories and statements that may be issued for individual or multiple forecast zones or...

April 27

Preparing for Severe Weather with Convective Outlooks

Severe weather season is continuing this week, with several days of severe weather forecast across the central and southeastern US. Convective outlooks provide insight into the potential for severe weather for up to a week out, giving the probabilities of areas seeing severe weather such as large hail, damaging winds, and even tornadoes. We continue our severe weather product series where we highlight severe weather-related features of the Aeris API and Aeris Maps platform. Last time, we discussed our storm cell features and how they provide information on where storms are currently and where they’re heading. This time, we’re going to look at convective...

April 12

Storm Cells – Tracking the Storms

Where are the storms? Where are they heading? What cities are in their path? With severe weather season in full swing, these are some common questions that can be answered using data from current storm cells. This article is the second in our series highlighting the severe weather-related features of the Aeris API. In our first article, we highlighted the various severe weather features of the Aeris API. This time, we will expand on the storm cells API endpoint and AMP layers. The stormcells endpoint provides information on the individual storm cells across the United States, including Puerto Rico and Guam....

Severe Weather Endpoints
April 6

Severe Weather with the Aeris API

Severe weather season is upon us again. Unfortunately major outbreaks have already occurred across the Southern Plains and throughout the Southeastern U.S. recently. Over the past week, more than 100 tornado-related and over 500 hail reports have been received. Our Aeris Weather API provides a variety of severe weather-related endpoints you can use in your own applications so you and your users stay on top of threatening conditions. All of the severe weather endpoints we’ll review are available via our Aeris API Premium and free developer accounts. This article will be the first in a series detailing our severe weather-related endpoints. We will first highlight the severe...

December 7

There’s a Weather Index For That!

We are all familiar with the direct impact weather conditions can have on our day-to-day lives. There are days where hanging out at the beach seems like a no-brainer. On the contrary, we have all experienced circumstances that prevented us from doing something as simple as driving to the supermarket. As technologies have advanced we have been able to not only observe and report current conditions, but also accurately provide weather forecasts. To some degree, we can literally predict the future. But what if we took that one step further? What if we were able to forecast the potential for...

3d view of Matthew
September 28

Blending Data with Aeris Maps

With Tropical Storm Matthew heading towards the Caribbean, we’ve been testing our upcoming tropical layers for the Aeris Maps Platform. In the process, we also experimented with combining different layers with some of the advanced AMP features such as blends: With the above image, we combined the flat-dk and water-depth base layers. Then added the high-resolution visible satellite imagery with a hard-light blend: flat-dk,water-depth,sat-vis-hires:blend(hard-light) The hard light blend allows the blue from the water layer to mix with the darker areas of the visible satellite while leaving the clouds white. Adding the lightning strike density layer to the map, which...

June 16

Recreating the Parallax Menu in Aeris Pulse iOS

We’ve had several users of our Aeris Weather iOS SDK ask us about whether the parallax UITableViewCells in the map layer menu of Aeris Pulse was available as part of the SDK, or how we achieved the effect.   Although this menu is not offered as part of our iOS SDK, it’s really easy to implement. There are just a few main steps you need to perform to get this effect working in your own apps. The following code samples are provided using Swift, but can easily be ported over to Objective-C if you haven’t jumped into Swift yet. Generate background images...