Tag: aerisweather

Highs Friday
April 27

2021 Earth Day: Huge Environmental Challenges Remain – Using Drones to Track Tornado Damage

NOAA 2021: Big Environmental Challenges Remain ”He that plants trees loves others besides himself” wrote 17th century historian Thomas Fuller. Much has improved since the first Earth Day in 1970. Big challenges remain. Warming gases are increasing faster than anytime in the geological record; the 6 warmest years on record observed since 2015. Worldwide: 50 separate billion-dollar weather disasters in 2020, a new record. More than 4 out of 10 Americans breathe unhealthy air, with a disproportionate impact on people of color. Every day 2 million tons of sewage are flushed into our rivers and oceans. Every year 9 million...

Hurricane Florence
April 18

Will a New GFS Weather Model Upgrade Close the Gap with The European Model?

Image credit: NOAA Are you with Team GFS or Team ECMWF, the “European Model”? I hate to pick sides, but as a meteorologist I defer to the weather model that, consistently, is most accurate. Of course I’m rooting for the “American Model”, the GFS or Global Forecast System, to win. But here’s the thing: if you’re sanding a table or building a deck you want to use the best tools at your disposal, right? So it goes with weather forecasting. Meteorologists examine scores of models, looking for consistency, continuity, and trends – ultimately choosing a blend of model solutions that...

April 15

Status of Spring Based on “First-Leaf Observations” – Flash Flood Awareness – Ask a Meteorologist About Risk

Spring Leaf Index AnomalyNational Phenology Network Status of Spring. In spite of recent snows and based on (first leaf) observations, spring green-up has come about 10-15 days ahead of schedule, based on data collected by The National Phenology Network: “Spring leaf out continues to spread north across the country. After arriving early in southern parts of Southwest and Southeast states, cold temperatures halted the progress of spring leaf out for several days across the northern part of the Southeast, Southern Great Plains, and mid-Atlantic. Spring leaf out is now arriving days to weeks early across the northern Great Plains, Midwest,...

lumpy-snow with sky and trees
March 19

“Lumpy Winter” – No More Greek Names for Hurricanes

Paul Douglas What a Strange Winter It Has Been On paper our winter has been been “average” in terms of snowfall and temperatures in the metro. It sure hasn’t seemed average to me. Record snows in October, green lawns in December, a fairly balmy January, followed by a frigid February. Lumpy – all or nothing. Dr. Ken Blumenfeld, Senior Climatologist at the Minnesota State Climate Office, was on WCCO Radio with Jordana Green and me Tuesday. He said some things that got my attention. In spite of a polar February, the period November thru March will be one of the...

Denver snow
March 12

Will La Nina Turbocharge Tornado Season in 2021 – One to Three Feet of Snow Possible Near Denver This Weekend

“Eye of the Storm”. This was one of my radar screens yesterday as tornadic storms were pushing over Northfield, showing a perfectly concentric “rain hole” over Wright county. Kind of odd, but it quickly dawned on me that this was the center of low pressure rippling northeastward, not some quirky inland hurricane sent here to terrify us. Modified Pacific Flow. A few Canadian slaps, sure, but the flow is predicted to be roughly zonal into mid-March, meaning temperatures at or above normal across most of the Lower 48 states. Briefing: Issued Wednesday, March 10th, 2021: Heavy Snow From Wyoming to...

highs-wednesday-3.11-radar
March 11

Flashes of Summer Out East – Hurricane Blind Spot – Is Tornado Alley Shifting?

A Few Cold Slaps. March giveth, and March taketh away. Today’s 2-week forecast of 500mb (18,000 foot) winds valid the evening of March 23 looks colder than yesterday’s simulation. It would be wildly premature to pack away the heavy jackets (or pull out driveway stakes). Global temperature departures from average during February 2021, as compared to 1981-2010.Copernicus Climate Change Service U.S. Sees Coldest February Since 1989 Amid Global Temperature Dip. Capital Weather Gang has details: “…The cold in the U.S., combined with unusually frigid air across much of Eurasia, resulted in global warmth less pronounced compared to recent Februaries, according...

API Historical Conditions
March 9

Expanded Global Historical Weather Conditions

Last summer, we introduced the conditions endpoint. Since it’s release, we have been working on improving the endpoint and adding additional data sources and historical weather conditions. Recently, we integrated infrared satellite as an additional data source, and with our AerisWeather API v1.16 release, we are announcing support for expanded global historical conditions. Check out the release history to review the complete list of improvements in this API release. Global Historical Weather Conditions In October, we expanded support for global hourly gap-free weather conditions for the past 30 days and over ten years of historical conditions for limited regions based on observation...

sunset_March_8_2021
March 9

Coldest February Since 1989 – High Resolution Weather Will Power Renewable Energy Sources

NOAA, Twitter Wild Swings. February was the coldest since 1989 for the U.S. – now 60s in early March. In fact, factoring wind chill, today will feel nearly 100 degrees warmer than it did roughly a month ago across much of Minnesota. Incredible. Shifting Gears. We’ll see more cold frontal passages (no kidding) and I expect a few more slushy encounters before daffodils start poking up in April, but looking out two weeks NOAA’s GFS model shows a predominately zonal (west to east) flow, suggesting temperatures slightly above average northern tier of the USA and well above normal over the...

2016-north-america-usa
March 2

High-Resolution Weather Predictions Will Power the Clean Energy Revolution

High-Resolution Weather Predictions Will Power the Clean Energy Revolution Winston Churchill had it right. The future is a riddle, wrapped inside a mystery, inside an enigma. Predictions are always tenuous, but one thing is increasingly apparent: what worked in the 1970s probably will not work in the 2030s. The election of President Joseph Biden has accelerated a transition to a more sustainable, clean-energy future for the United States. But federal incentives and stimulus are only part of the equation. Market forces are already in play, powering and accelerating an inevitable transition to wind, solar, energy storage, biofuels, tidal power and...

January 29

Atmospheric Rivers – Stratospheric Warming Impacting Polar Vortex – Very Little Ice on Great Lakes

Star Tribune Another Low Ice Year Predicted on Lake Superior, Great Lakes. Star Tribune has an update: “As the sun rose over this corner of Lake Superior on Wednesday morning, the windchill was nearly 30 below. Open water at last disappeared under a thin layer of ice after stubbornly sticking it out through an unseasonably warm January. But just over the horizon, the waves remained. For the second season in a row, Lake Superior and the Great Lakes as a whole are expected to have below-average ice, which could increase shoreline erosion and threaten organisms that depend on ice cover,...