Tag: Hurricane

hurricane Humberto
September 3

Tracking “Omar” and “Nana” – Will We Run Out of Hurricane Names in 2020?

Like climate change, coronavirus often doesn’t hit home until it…hits home. One of my nieces at a big eastern university caught Covid-19 (she’s fine). My 91 year old mother-in-law, Josephine, also caught the virus and recovered. Her grandkids call her “Nana”, which is ironic. So far this year in the Atlantic we’ve had a Tropical Storm Josephine and a Tropical Storm Nana. 65-70 percent of hurricane season is ahead of us, with only 6 names remaining on the list. At this rate we may have to start over with the Greek alphabet. The last time that happened was 2005, the...

hurricane Florence from space
August 24

Tropical System Threatens Florida – Pandemic Complicates Hurricane Evacuation Plans

Hurricane Evacuations During a Pandemic? How on Earth do you safely evacuate tens or even hundreds of thousands of people inland, during the Age of Covid-19? Great question. We may soon find out. “Hanna” was a dry run in south Texas and “Douglas” narrowly missed Hawaii. Now there’s a new tropical system which may, in theory, impact Florida this weekend. Giving people more time to prepare, opening up hotels, in addition to schools, to evacuees, and encouraging people who’s homes are up to code to stay put may help, but during a chaotic rush inland, social distancing and mask hygiene...

Destroyed building from hurricane
July 5

What To Do After a Hurricane

Hurricanes are America’s deadliest natural disasters. They’re expensive, too. According to USA FACTS, adjusting for inflation, 7 of the 10 most expensive natural disasters have been hurricanes. Of those 7, 6 have happened since 2000. Technological breakthroughs like weather satellites and computer models have lowered the death toll over time, but there are harrowing exceptions. In spite of timely warnings, Hurricane Katrina (2005) left 1,833 dead and Hurricane Maria (2017) killed 2,981 people. It may be counterintuitive, but most of the deaths occurred days or even weeks after the hurricane struck. “Statistics now show that more people are being killed...

tropical storm Sebastian
October 3

Is It Time to Scrap the Saffir-Simpson Hurricane Rating Scale?

MIT Tropical Expert: “The Saffir-Simpson scale is deeply deficient and should be discarded.” Science evolves over time. Our understanding of the natural world improves as new technology comes online, leveraging more granular, reliable, repeatable data sets. The science of meteorology, like every other science, is a moving target. The Fujita tornado rating scale was upgraded and enhanced in 2006 to better reflect observed wind damage. NOAA is launching WSSI, the Winter Storm Severity Index, a new, experimental winter storm rating scale with five categories. Sound familiar? Is it time to rethink the Saffir-Simpson rating scale for hurricanes, which only predicts...

Hurricane From Space
July 11

Steps to Take Before a Hurricane Arrives

“Hurricanes have killed more people in the last 50 years than any other natural cataclysm” according to MIT meteorology professor and tropical scientist Kerry Emanuel. I’m an old Eagle Scout, and the motto: “Be Prepared” is as relevant today as ever. Get out in front of risk. Take steps (now) to avoid serious problems (later). That mindset certainly applies to the biggest, wildest, most terrifying storms on the planet. What have I learned tracking these fickle weather beasts over the course of 4 decades? Don’t count on the latest technology or the government to save you. At the end of...

satellite image of earth with hurricane
March 8

Rapid Ocean Warming Poses New Challenges for Tropical Cyclone Prediction

Better Hurricane Forecasts Will Require Near-Real-Time, Deep Ocean Monitoring “How many more eyewall replacement cycles before landfall? Let me check the latest real-time, deep ocean temperature anomalies first”. This scenario may not be as far-fetched as it sounds. Recent studies confirm warming of the world’s oceans is taking place faster than previously estimated; as much as 40% faster than the United Nations estimated in 2015. The implications of warming seas include stronger and more rapidly-intensifying hurricanes and more extreme rainfall amounts. Research confirms roughly 93% of the additional warming from man-made greenhouse gases is going into the world’s oceans. Climate...

Hurricane Florence Image
September 10

Tropical API Archive Now Available

With the traditional peak of the tropical season underway, we have been busy with the release of the new tropical API addition to the AerisWeather API and new tropical map layers within the AerisWeather Maps Platform (AMP). Together, these products can better prepare you for imminent threats from tropical cyclones and help reduce storm risks when utilized within organizations. Today, we are excited to announce the addition of archive data for tropical cyclones to the new tropical API. Using data from the National Hurricane Center (NHC) and Joint Typhoon Warning Center (JTWC), our API includes information for tropical cyclones starting...

August 31

New Tropical Map Layers in the AerisWeather Mapping Platform

We recently introduced the new Hurricane API, including the tropical cyclones endpoint, within our AerisWeather API. And while real-time, easy-to-use data is useful, visualizations of that data is what helps tell the story in minimizing storm risks. Today, we are announcing new tropical map layers within the AerisWeather Maps Platform (AMP). These new tropical map layers allow you to create a variety of tropical weather maps within your own apps and projects. Tropical Cyclones, the Primary Layer The single tropical cyclones layer is the most commonly used tropical layer and displays all active cyclones across the globe, including the Atlantic, East Pacific...