Tag: lightning

May 10

What to Expect When You Choose AerisWeather Webhooks

AeisWeather’s Webhooks allow businesses to easily receive weather information pertinent to their operations. Our Webhooks are customizable to include the specific data needed and are adaptable for creating end-user products. The following steps walk through what you can expect as your business works with AerisWeather to implement your weather webhooks – including creation, response, analysis, and use. The Process First, AerisWeather will work with you to configure a specific Webhook based on your business requirements and geographic extents. Webhooks can be created around any endpoint or data values that we currently offer, though we most often recommend using them for...

May 10

Tutorial: Setting Up a Webhook Endpoint

AerisWeather’s Webhooks provide timely notifications of the weather events that you care about most. Eliminate the need for continuous polling, along with the need to worry about missing critical alerts. Webhooks deliver all of your weather events – whether it be lightning, approaching storms, or other – rapidly and directly right to you. In this webhook tutorial, we’ll cover setting up your own webhook endpoint from scratch on Amazon Web Services (AWS). We’ll also go over some best practices to help you get the most out of Webhooks. Before Getting Started There are some things you should know before going...

January 25

How 2020 Covid Lockdowns May Have Decreased Lightning Strikes – Wind Power Pulling Ahead of Solar

NOAA GFS Temperatures for MSPweatherbell.com Too Cold To Snow (Much) Anytime Soon ”It’s too cold to snow!” Well, sort of. There is some scientific validity to that old proverb. Too cold to snow (much). Of course it can snow at any temperature colder than 32F, but when it’s subzero the main storm track is shoved too far south. Storms thrive along the contrast, the boundary, between warm and cold. We can still pick up scrawny little clippers capable of wind- whipped powder, but the big, sloppy, moisture-rich one-foot-plus storms don’t have a chance. As temperatures mellow a bit, which should,...

August 31

Soggy Remains of “Ida” Threaten Mid Atlantic with Severe Flooding – Climate’s Role in Rapid Hurricane Intensification

GFS 2-Week Jet Stream Forecast No Rush Into Autumn. I still suspect September will wind up milder than average with more 80s, possibly another shot at 90 degrees – and with any luck showers and storms will become a bit more frequent in the weeks to come. Inland Flooding Potential from “Ida”NOAA and Praedictix August 29, 2021 file image of Hurricane IdaNOAA and AerisWeather In the History of Hurricane Names, “I” Stands for Infamous. They come at the midpoint of the hurricane season when ocean water temperatures are warmest, capable of fueling the most intense hurricanes. A little interesting trivia...

Lighting Strike API
June 5

Lightning Strike API Now Available

Severe Weather season is in full swing in the US and that means lightning strikes are a common concern. According to the UK Met Office, there are over 1.4 billion lightning strikes globally per year or around 44 per second.  That’s a lot of lightning, and now it’s available for use with our new Lightning Strike API endpoints! As a value-added reseller of Earth Networks Total Lightning Network, we have been working hard to add lightning to our Weather API offerings. Last year, we added lightning strikes to AerisWeather Maps and today we are announcing the addition of two lightning strike...

Lightning strike onto horizon
May 31

“Thunder is good, thunder is impressive; but it is lightning that does the work.”

The title of this post is a quote by Mark Twain. Most of us have had a close call with lightning, and no wonder. Cloud to ground lightning strikes the United States 25 million times every year. According to NOAA, an average of 47 Americans are struck and killed by lightning annually – deadlier than tornadoes and hurricanes many years. Lightning is terrifying and vaguely mysterious – scientists don’t begin to have all the answers. But it serves a purpose in nature. These crackling electrostatic discharges strike Earth approximately 50 times a second – roughly 1.4 billion flashes every year...